CDC
These Workshops are Sponsored by:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Vector
Vector Control


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  • Registration is no longer available for this course. NEHA worked with CDC, the National Network of Public Health Institutes, Texas Health Institute, Tulane University and renowned subject-matter experts to update and expand this training. The new expanded training – Vector Control for Environmental Health Professionals – is housed on Tulane University’s Learning Management System and is preapproved for NEHA continuing education credits. Find out more or register to take the course here: http://lms.southcentralpartnership.org/vcehp.php

     

    RMSFThis 3 day workshop was recorded in Chandler, AZ in February 2012. The purpose of this training is to provide strong foundational knowledge for the control of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) and other tick-borne diseases through the science of integrated pest management (IPM) including effective animal control. The training provides public health professionals and partners with the knowledge and skills they need to effectively reduce tick-borne illnesses with special emphasis on RMSF.
  • Registration is no longer available for this course. NEHA worked with CDC, the National Network of Public Health Institutes, Texas Health Institute, Tulane University and renowned subject-matter experts to update and expand this training. The new expanded training – Vector Control for Environmental Health Professionals – is housed on Tulane University’s Learning Management System and is preapproved for NEHA continuing education credits. Find out more or register to take the course here: http://lms.southcentralpartnership.org/vcehp.php

     

    2010 WorkshopThis 2 ½ day workshop recorded in New Orleans, LA in January of 2010 includes lecture, discussion and visual training on integrated pest management (IPM) to control insects and rodents with a specific emphasis on the biology and control of rodents and bed bugs. This course is a modified and updated version of CDC0702, Biology and Control of Insects and Rodents but does not include all previous modules such as tick control and bioterrorism. In addition to detailed training in rodent and bed bug control, this course also includes a new module on the effects of global climate change on pests and disease vectors.
  • Registration is no longer available for this course. NEHA worked with CDC, the National Network of Public Health Institutes, Texas Health Institute, Tulane University and renowned subject-matter experts to update and expand this training. The new expanded training – Vector Control for Environmental Health Professionals – is housed on Tulane University’s Learning Management System and is preapproved for NEHA continuing education credits. Find out more or register to take the course here: http://lms.southcentralpartnership.org/vcehp.php

     

    2007 WorkshopThis program is a 2-day pre-conference workshop recorded at the 2007 and 2008 AECs. The courses includes lecture and discussion on integrated pest management (IPM), vector-borne diseases, biology and control of insect and rodent vectors and public health pests, effective pest control methods, and vector-borne diseases as possible bioterror agents.